CALL TODAY FOR A FREE CONSULTATION
TOLL-FREE: 877.702.7800 | LOCAL: 415.432.7290

California Unfair & Deceptive Debt Collection Attorneys

Choulos, Choulos & Wyle represents consumers who have been victims of unfair and deceptive debt collection attempts. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) does not allow debt collectors and collection agencies to be abusive, unfair or deceptive when trying to collect a debt.

Consumer Rights

If a debt collector violates the FDCPA when trying to collect a debt, consumers may sue for damages such as lost wages and medical bills incurred to to the illegal collection practices or attempts. However, if the debt is owed, it is not forgiven just because a collection agency has broken the law. Below are some Frequently Asked Questions from the Federal Trade Commission about consumer rights after being referred to a collection agency.

What types of debts are covered?

The Act covers personal, family, and household debts, including money you owe on a personal credit card account, an auto loan, a medical bill, and your mortgage. The FDCPA doesn’t cover debts you incurred to run a business.

Can a debt collector contact me any time or any place?

No. A debt collector may not contact you at inconvenient times or places, such as before 8 in the morning or after 9 at night, unless you agree to it. And collectors may not contact you at work if they’re told (orally or in writing) that you’re not allowed to get calls there.

Debt collectors can contact you by phone, letter, email or text message to collect a debt, as long as they follow the rules and disclose that they are debt collectors. No matter how they communicate with you, it’s against the law for a debt collector to pretend to be someone else — like an attorney or government agency — or to harass, threaten or deceive you.

How can I stop a debt collector from contacting me?

If a collector contacts you about a debt, you may want to talk to them at least once to see if you can resolve the matter – even if you don’t think you owe the debt, can’t repay it immediately, or think that the collector is contacting you by mistake. If you decide after contacting the debt collector that you don’t want the collector to contact you again, tell the collector – in writing – to stop contacting you. Here’s how to do that:

Make a copy of your letter. Send the original by certified mail, and pay for a “return receipt” so you’ll be able to document what the collector received. Once the collector receives your letter, they may not contact you again, with two exceptions: a collector can contact you to tell you there will be no further contact or to let you know that they or the creditor intend to take a specific action, like filing a lawsuit. Sending such a letter to a debt collector you owe money to does not get rid of the debt, but it should stop the contact. The creditor or the debt collector still can sue you to collect the debt.

What practices are off limits for debt collectors?

Harassment. Debt collectors may not harass, oppress, or abuse you or any third parties they contact. For example, they may not:

  • use threats of violence or harm;
  • publish a list of names of people who refuse to pay their debts (but they can give this information to the credit reporting companies);
  • use obscene or profane language; or
  • repeatedly use the phone to annoy someone.

False statements. Debt collectors may not lie when they are trying to collect a debt. For example, they may not:

  • falsely claim that they are attorneys or government representatives;
  • falsely claim that you have committed a crime;
  • falsely represent that they operate or work for a credit reporting company;
  • misrepresent the amount you owe;
  • indicate that papers they send you are legal forms if they aren’t; or
  • indicate that papers they send to you aren’t legal forms if they are.

Debt collectors also are prohibited from saying that:

  • you will be arrested if you don’t pay your debt;
  • they’ll seize, garnish, attach, or sell your property or wages unless they are permitted by law to take the action and intend to do so; or
  • legal action will be taken against you, if doing so would be illegal or if they don’t intend to take the action.

Debt collectors may not:

  • give false credit information about you to anyone, including a credit reporting company;
  • send you anything that looks like an official document from a court or government agency if it isn’t; or
  • use a false company name.

Unfair practices. Debt collectors may not engage in unfair practices when they try to collect a debt. For example, they may not:

  • try to collect any interest, fee, or other charge on top of the amount you owe unless the contract that created your debt – or your state law – allows the charge;
  • deposit a post-dated check early;
  • take or threaten to take your property unless it can be done legally; or
  • contact you by postcard.

For a full list of FAQs and additional resources on the unfair or deceptive practice of debt collection, visit the FTC website. If you have been harassed, abused, deceived or otherwise treated unfairly by a collection agency, please contact us for a free consultation.

SUCCESSFUL CASE RESULTS

Client vs. Private Bus Company

Wrongful Death of Husband and Father in Bus Accident Settlement: $4,200,000

Client vs. State of California

Dangerous highway off -ramp resulting in spinal injuries and paralysis Settel ment: $2.800,000

Client vs. Western Building

Construction truck runs red light, hits pedestrian and causes Brain Damage Settlement: $2.030,000

Client vs. Tow Truck Company

Fatal truck crash, wrongful death policy limits Settlement $545,000

THE LEGAL EXAMINER

SAN FRANCISCO